Designer and Illustrator working from a poorly insulated Attic at the bottom of the world.

Designer @ Critic Magazine & Co-founder of The Attic d.blackball@gmail.com

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Very few places in the world where the guy in the back of the room (or in the back of a car going out to chick’s hotel) is someone as legendary as Mr. Gutteridge. My interactions with him were minimal but he was an incredibly nice person and I hope the people that were close to him are doing ok. 

Very few places in the world where the guy in the back of the room (or in the back of a car going out to chick’s hotel) is someone as legendary as Mr. Gutteridge. My interactions with him were minimal but he was an incredibly nice person and I hope the people that were close to him are doing ok. 

Peter Gutteridge - Ocean

urbankill:

radiocola:

thank you for living a sound that is beautiful and brutal. fucking sad. 

http://www.offthetracks.co.nz/r-i-p-peter-gutteridge/

The cover I did for this week’s issue of Critic. Use as directed. www.critic.co.nz

The cover I did for this week’s issue of Critic. Use as directed. www.critic.co.nz

frushtoduth replied to your photo:I wish the third season was better than it…

Hurrah! Also, does that mean it’s Hannibal time for Dannibal?

yep. you have sold it to me (so it better be good)

I wish the third season was better than it actually was but Borgen has been such a good watch.

I wish the third season was better than it actually was but Borgen has been such a good watch.

anthonietonnon:

Listen/purchase: The Attic Singles Club 07: Anthonie Tonnon by Anthonie Tonnon

Kudos again to The Attic for making this with us. The band version of The Operation, which we played recently in Auckland, is knocking my socks off. Looking forward to Daniel from the Attic hearing that one. 

From Critic magazine issue 22 for the feature ‘Social Hair’ by Lucy Hunter.
“By looking at a person’s hair you can make assumptions about their age, ethnicity, gender, occupation, political views, their taste in music, income, lifestyle, religion, health, and sexuality. All from something that makes you want to puke if you find it in your meal.From Dunedin’s extraordinary wig factory, Freedom Hair, to gendered “norms” around body hair, Lucy Hunter explores a surprising cultural phenomenon.”

From Critic magazine issue 22 for the feature ‘Social Hair’ by Lucy Hunter.

By looking at a person’s hair you can make assumptions about their age, ethnicity, gender, occupation, political views, their taste in music, income, lifestyle, religion, health, and sexuality. All from something that makes you want to puke if you find it in your meal.From Dunedin’s extraordinary wig factory, Freedom Hair, to gendered “norms” around body hair, Lucy Hunter explores a surprising cultural phenomenon.”

From Critic magazine issue 22 for the feature ‘Scarfie Confessions’ by Max Callister-Baker. The feature recounts the night the slightly intoxicated author and his friends shared their encounters with the “supernatural”.

From Critic magazine issue 22 for the feature ‘Scarfie Confessions’ by Max Callister-Baker. The feature recounts the night the slightly intoxicated author and his friends shared their encounters with the “supernatural”.

alexlsphotography:

Shoot film. Its amazing. These are two from a couple of rolls that I only just picked up (12 months late) from my local lab. Scanned on V700 and corrected in photoshop. Daniel will probably hate me for this…Oh god the grain, my eyes, I can’t look away…

Collage for Critic issue 21 2014 for the feature ‘Geocaching: a diary of unrequited enterprise’ by Josie Adams.
“Children often like to draw maps and mark an X on the spot where they want to find treasure. There never seems to be any, but today there are more than 2,500 hidden treasures in Dunedin. Every day in our city these treasures are found, swapped around, and put back for you to find by a whole community of curiosity curators. They are geocachers, in operation since the early 2000s.”


Collage for Critic issue 21 2014 for the feature ‘Geocaching: a diary of unrequited enterprise’ by Josie Adams.

“Children often like to draw maps and mark an X on the spot where they want to find treasure. There never seems to be any, but today there are more than 2,500 hidden treasures in Dunedin. Every day in our city these treasures are found, swapped around, and put back for you to find by a whole community of curiosity curators. They are geocachers, in operation since the early 2000s.”